1
Information on storm surges (what they are and how they are formed). Tips to be ready for storm surges. Videos. Downloadable PDF guides (English and Spanish).
Grade Level   K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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2
Thunder is the result of the rapid expansion of super heated air caused by the extremely high temperature of lightning. Through a series of examples, the student will be able to determine the distance to a lightning strike.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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3
SKYWARN is a concept developed in the early 1970d that was intended to promote a cooperatve effort between the National Weather Service and communities. The emphasis of the effort is often focused on the storm spotter, an individual who takes a position near their community and reports wind gusts,...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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4
Rain and hail will be suspended by the updraft inside a thunderstorm until the weight of the hail and water can no longer by supported. Usually, the stronger the updraft in a thunderstorm, the more intense the storm and the larger size of hail that can be produced. Suspending a ping pong ball in th...
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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5
The updrafts in thunderstorms can be extremely strong. The stronger the updraft, the more weight of rain and hair that can be supported. This experiment will show thta cotton balls, like clouds, hold a tremendous amount of water. In nature, once the weight of water is more than can be supported by...
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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6
Analyzing maps with the current weather conditions is an essential part of the entire forecast process. Basically, if we do not know what is currently occurring, it is near impossible to predict what will happen in the future. In this lesson plan, the students will determine the location of cold and...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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7
Meteorologists often refer to ridges and troughs in the upper atmosphere when explaining the reason for the weather one experiences. Yet all one sees are lines on a weather map. However, these weather systems are high and low places in the atmosphere as this lesson will demonstrate.
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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8
Clouds are divided into four basic forms (Cirro-form, Strato-form, Cumulo-form and Nimbo-form) at three basic levels (low, middle, and high) in the atmosphere. Many locations may experience all of these different types of clouds daily. The students will become better observers of the sky by...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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9
Clouds are divided into four basic forms (Cirro-form, Strato-form, Cumulo-form and Nimbo-form) at three basic levels (low, middle, and high) in the atmosphere. Many locations may experience all of these different types of clouds daily. The students will become better observers of the sky by...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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10
In a clean-air chamber (all solid particles are filtered out) a cloud will not form even with a relative humidity greater than 200%. While clouds are made up of droplets that are essentially distilled water, each droplet is not 100% pure. At the cloud droplet's core is a tiny water attracting...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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11
Collision and coalescence is the process by which cloud droplets grow large enough to fall as rain in clouds. You will suspend two ping pong balls in the stream of air supplied by a hair dryer. The balls will bump into each other, creating a clicking sound signifying the collision.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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12
We feel the wind everyday. The air is almost always in motion. One day it may be from the north and the next day from the south. There are many sources for wind: mechanical sources such as fans and, in nature, falling rain as it drags air along. But what is the origin of wind on the earth? Using a...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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13
Sometimes a claim is made that Christopher Columbus sailed west to prove the world was round and not flat, but that wasn't the case at all. Even in ancient times sailors knew that the Earth was round and ancient scientists not only suspected it was a sphere, but even estimated its size. Measuring...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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14
The Earth is in constant motion. Each day the earth makes one complete rotation. Each year, the earth makes one orbit of the sun. The first motion is obvious. The second one, however, is muh harder to notice except over a much longer period and can be made visible only by some time and some...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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15
We observe the different angles between the sun, earth, and moon by the phases of the moon we see each month. Students, acting as the earth, will see differences in light and dark sides of their hand-held moon.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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16
Ocean water is salty and, in general, cold. Differences in the water density associated with temperature and salinity are vital in shaping the Great Ocean Conveyor. This lesson plan demonstrates how salinity and temperature affect density of water.
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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17
The constant pushing of molecules into each other if the reason we feel wind. As one molecule bumps into another, it transfers energy into the next molecule. This constant pushing on the oceans surface also transfers energy to the water. This energy transfer is responsible for the motion of the...
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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18
Onjects float if they weigh less than the weight o the water they displace. Conversely, onjects will sink if they weigh more than the weight of the water they displace. Students will observe how the added sigar in a can of soda affecs its ability to float in water by the change of density.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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19
Just as air can have different densities, water can have different densities as well. As the salinity of water increases, the density increases as well. Fresh eggs will float in saltwater, but will sink in freshwater. This will show that as the salinity increases the density also increases.
Grade Level   4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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20
We all know the oceans are salty but so are other sources of water. The oceans have a salinity (salt content) of 35%. The Dead Sea has an average salinity of 290%, almost nine times saltier than the oceans. But what actually does that mean? Just how salty tasting are these various bodies of water?...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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