1
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
Tens of millions of years ago, plate tectonics set North and South America on an unavoidable collision course that would change the face of the Earth and spell life or death for thousands of species. Juan D. Carrillo explains the massive biological repercussions of this collision, which caused one...
Grade Level   5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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2
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
Atmospheric scientist Karen Kosiba studies how tornadoes form and do damage. Getting measurements near the surface of these twisters is difficult, though, and driving into them is a practice mostly reserved for the big screen. In this TEDYouth Talk, Kosiba describes how she and her team use...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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3
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
In a fun, excited talk, teenager Henry Lin looks at something unexpected in the sky: galaxy clusters. By studying the properties of the unverse's largest pieces, says the Intel Science Fair Winner, we can learn quite a lot about our own world ad galaxy.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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4
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
You already know that a trip to the beach can give you a nasty sunburn, but the nitty gritty of sun safety is actually much more complex. Wrinkle-causing UVA rays and burn-inducing UVB's can pose a serious risk to your health (and good looks). So what can you do? Kevin P. Boyd makes the case to slap...
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5
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
Why do some regions experience full-time heat while others are reckoning with frigid temperatures and snow? And why are the seasons reversed in the two hemispheres? Rebecca Kaplan explains how the shape of the Earth's orbit around the Sun and the Earth's tilt on its axis affect the amount of...
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6
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
Tornadoes are the most violent storms on Earth, with wind velocities that can exceed 200 miles per hour. How do these terrifying cyclones form? Meteorologist James Spann sheds light on the lifespan of tornadoes as they go from supercell thunderstorms to terrible twisters before eventually dissolving...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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7
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
"In this short talk, TED Fellow Sarah Parcak introduces the field of """"space archeology"""" -- using satellite images to search for clues to the lost sites of past civilizations."
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8
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
Why do we see those stunning lights in the northern- and southernmost portions of the night sky? The Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis occur when high-energy particles are flung from the Sun's corona toward the Earth and mingle with the neutral atoms in our atmosphere -- ultimately emitting...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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9
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
How can the shadow of the tiny moon eclipse the sight of the gargantuan sun? By sheer coincedence, the dsc of the sun in 400x larger than the disc of the moon, but it's 390x farther from Earth -- which means that when they align just right, the moon blocks all but the sun's glowing corona. Andy...
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10
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
How could you dispose of your cooking oil when you're done cooking? The easiest thing to do might be to pour it down your drain -- but if you save it up and send it to a processing plant, it can gain useful new life as biodiesel, a biodegradable energy source which can run in diesel engines instead...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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11
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
Energy is neither created nor destroyed — and yet the global demand for it continues to increase. But where does energy come from, and where does it go? Joshua M. Sneideman examines the many ways in which energy cycles through our planet, from the sun to our food chain to electricity and beyond.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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12
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
Too often we think of air as empty space — but compared to a vacuum, air is actually pretty heavy. So, just how heavy is it? And if it's so heavy, why doesn't it crush us? Dan Quinn describes the fundamentals of air pressure and explains how it affects our bodies, the weather and the universe at...
Grade Level   K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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13
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
There's a lot of talk these days about when and how we might all move to Mars. But what would it actually be like to live there? Mari Foroutan details the features of Mars that are remarkably similar to those of Earth — and those that can only be found on the red planet.
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14
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
Did you know that gold is extraterrestrial? Instead of arising from our planet’s rocky crust, it was actually cooked up in space and is present on Earth because of cataclysmic stellar explosions called supernovae. CERN Scientist David Lunney outlines the incredible journey of gold from space to...
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15
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
The study of clouds has always been a daydreamer’s science, aptly founded by a thoughtful young man whose favorite activity was staring out of the window at the sky. Richard Hamblyn tells the history of Luke Howard, the man who classified the clouds and forever changed humanity’s understanding...
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16
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
One could say that snowflakes are simply frozen water -- but if you compare a snowflake to an ice cube, you'll notice the big difference. Why are all snowflakes six-sided? Why are none of them exactly the same? Marusa Bradac sheds light on the secret life of snowflakes.
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17
By TED-Ed
Published in 2017
In 1995, scientists pointed the Hubble Telescope at an area of the sky near the Big Dipper. The location was apparently empty, and the whole endeavor was risky -- what, if anything, was going to show up? But what came back was nothing short of spectacular: an image of over 1,500 galaxies glimmering...
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18
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
It's been a long road to the discovery that Earth is not the center of the Solar System, the Milky Way, or the universe; great thinker from Aristotle to Bruno have grappled with it for millenia. But if we aren't at the center of the universe, what is? Marjee Chmiel and Trevor Owens discuss where we...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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19
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
"Suppose you placed a camera at a fixed position, took a picture of the sky at the same time every day for an entire year, and overlaid all of the photos on top of each other. What would th esun look like in that combined mage? A stationary dot? A circular path? Neither. Oddly enough, it makes a...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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20
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
Just now, somewhere in the universe, a star exploded. In fact, a supernova occurs every second or so in the observable universe. Yet, we've never actually been able to watch a supernova in its first violent moments. Is early detection possible? Samantha Kuula details the science behind an early...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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