1
By TED-Ed
Published in 2016
Lake Maracaibo is the stormiest place on the planet. Thunderstorms rage above this massive body of water for up to 200 days of the year, with each ear-splitting event lasting for several hours. But why? Graeme Anderson lists the factors that create Lake Maracaibo's seemingly everlasting storms.
Grade Level   K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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2
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
Why do some regions experience full-time heat while others are reckoning with frigid temperatures and snow? And why are the seasons reversed in the two hemispheres? Rebecca Kaplan explains how the shape of the Earth's orbit around the Sun and the Earth's tilt on its axis affect the amount of...
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3
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
How can the shadow of the tiny moon eclipse the sight of the gargantuan sun? By sheer coincedence, the dsc of the sun in 400x larger than the disc of the moon, but it's 390x farther from Earth -- which means that when they align just right, the moon blocks all but the sun's glowing corona. Andy...
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4
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
"In 1816, Europe and North America were plagued by heavy rains, odd-colored snow, famines, strange fogs and very cold weather well into June. Though many people believed it to be the apocalypse, this """"year without a summer"""" was actually the result of a supervolcano eruption that happened one...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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5
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
The study of clouds has always been a daydreamer’s science, aptly founded by a thoughtful young man whose favorite activity was staring out of the window at the sky. Richard Hamblyn tells the history of Luke Howard, the man who classified the clouds and forever changed humanity’s understanding...
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6
By TED-Ed
Published in 2016
At 8,850 meters above sea level, Qomolangma, also known as Mount Everest, has the highest altitude on the planet. But how did this towering formation get so tall? Michele Koppe peers deep into our planet's crust, where continental plates collede, to find the answer.
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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