1
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
Tens of millions of years ago, plate tectonics set North and South America on an unavoidable collision course that would change the face of the Earth and spell life or death for thousands of species. Juan D. Carrillo explains the massive biological repercussions of this collision, which caused one...
Grade Level   5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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2
By TED-Ed
Water covers over 70% of the Earth, cycling from the oceans and rivers to the clouds and back again. It even makes up about 60% of our bodies. But in the rest of the solar system, liquid water is almost impossible to find. So how did our planet end up with so much of this substance? And where did it...
Grade Level   K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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3
By TED-Ed
Published in 2016
North America didn't always have its familiar shape, nor its famed mountains, canyons, and plains: all of that was once contained in an unrecognizable mass, buried deep in Rodinia, a huge supercontinent that lay on the surface of the Earth. Peter J. Haproff explains how it took millions of years and...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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4
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
Why do we see those stunning lights in the northern- and southernmost portions of the night sky? The Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis occur when high-energy particles are flung from the Sun's corona toward the Earth and mingle with the neutral atoms in our atmosphere -- ultimately emitting...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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5
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
"In 1816, Europe and North America were plagued by heavy rains, odd-colored snow, famines, strange fogs and very cold weather well into June. Though many people believed it to be the apocalypse, this """"year without a summer"""" was actually the result of a supervolcano eruption that happened one...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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6
By TED-Ed
Published in 2016
At 8,850 meters above sea level, Qomolangma, also known as Mount Everest, has the highest altitude on the planet. But how did this towering formation get so tall? Michele Koppe peers deep into our planet's crust, where continental plates collede, to find the answer.
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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7
By TED-Ed
Published in 2017
In 1995, scientists pointed the Hubble Telescope at an area of the sky near the Big Dipper. The location was apparently empty, and the whole endeavor was risky -- what, if anything, was going to show up? But what came back was nothing short of spectacular: an image of over 1,500 galaxies glimmering...
Grade Level   K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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8
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
Our best technology can send men to the Moon and probes to the edge of our solar system, but these distances are vanishingly small compared to the size of the universe. How then can we learn about the galaxies beyond our own? Yuan-Sen Ting takes us into deep space to show how astronomers study the...
Grade Level   11 12
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9
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
The atoms around you have existed for billions of years -, and most originated in the flaming, gaseous core of a star. Dennis Woldfogel tells the captivating tale of these atoms' long journey from the Big Bang to the molecules they form today.
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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