41
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
One could say that snowflakes are simply frozen water -- but if you compare a snowflake to an ice cube, you'll notice the big difference. Why are all snowflakes six-sided? Why are none of them exactly the same? Marusa Bradac sheds light on the secret life of snowflakes.
Grade Level   K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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42
By TED-Ed
Published in 2016
The Earth intercepts a lot f solar power: 173,000 terawats. That's 10,000 times more power than the planet's population uses. So is it possible that one day the world could be completely reliant on solar energy? Richard Komp examines how solar panels convert solar energy to electrical energy.
Grade Level   4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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43
By TED-Ed
Published in 2016
About 66 million years ago, a terrible extinction event wiped out the dinosaurs. But it wasn't the only event of this kind -- extinctions of various severity have ocurred throughout the Earth's history -- and are still happening all around us today. Borths, D'Emic, ad Pritchard give a quick history...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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44
By TED-Ed
Published in 2016
At 8,850 meters above sea level, Qomolangma, also known as Mount Everest, has the highest altitude on the planet. But how did this towering formation get so tall? Michele Koppe peers deep into our planet's crust, where continental plates collede, to find the answer.
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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45
By TED-Ed
Published in 2017
In 1995, scientists pointed the Hubble Telescope at an area of the sky near the Big Dipper. The location was apparently empty, and the whole endeavor was risky -- what, if anything, was going to show up? But what came back was nothing short of spectacular: an image of over 1,500 galaxies glimmering...
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46
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
"The Arctic may seem like a frozen and desolate environment here nothing ever changes. But the climate of this unique and remote region can be both an early indicator of the climate of the rest of the Earth and a driver for weather patterns across the globe. William Chapman explains why scientists...
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47
By TED-Ed
Published in 2017
"Deep underground lie stores of once-inaccessible natural gas. There's technology, called hydraulic fracturing, or """"fracking,"""" that can extract this natural gas, potentially powering us for decades to come. So how does fracking work and why is it a source of such heated controversy? Mia...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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48
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
The Earth is 4.6 billion years old -- but how can humans relate to a number so colossal, and where do we fit on the geologic timeline? Comparing the Earth's lifetime to one calendar year, events like the extinction of dinosaurs and Columbus setting sail took place relatively recently. Joshua M....
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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49
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
It's been a long road to the discovery that Earth is not the center of the Solar System, the Milky Way, or the universe; great thinker from Aristotle to Bruno have grappled with it for millenia. But if we aren't at the center of the universe, what is? Marjee Chmiel and Trevor Owens discuss where we...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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50
By TED-Ed
Published in 2017
Our ability to mine great amounts of energy from uranium nuclei has led to bill nuclear power as a plentiful, utopian source of electricity. But rather than dominate the global electricity market, nuclear power has declined from a high of 18% in 1996 to 11% today. What happened to the great promise...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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51
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
"Suppose you placed a camera at a fixed position, took a picture of the sky at the same time every day for an entire year, and overlaid all of the photos on top of each other. What would th esun look like in that combined mage? A stationary dot? A circular path? Neither. Oddly enough, it makes a...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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52
By TED-Ed
Published in 2015
Just now, somewhere in the universe, a star exploded. In fact, a supernova occurs every second or so in the observable universe. Yet, we've never actually been able to watch a supernova in its first violent moments. Is early detection possible? Samantha Kuula details the science behind an early...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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53
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
Scientists have warned that as CO2 levels in the atmosphere rise an increase in Earth's temperature by even two degrees could lead to catastrophic effects across the world. But how can such a tiny, measurable change in one factor lead to huge, unpredictable changes elsewhere? Victor J. Donnay uses...
Grade Level   11 12
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54
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
When we look at the sky, we have a flat, two-dimensional view. So how do astronomers figure the distances of stars and galaxies from Earth? Yuan-Sen Ting shows us how trigonometric parallaxes, standard candles and more help us determine the distance of objects several billion light years away from...
Grade Level   11 12
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55
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
Our best technology can send men to the Moon and probes to the edge of our solar system, but these distances are vanishingly small compared to the size of the universe. How then can we learn about the galaxies beyond our own? Yuan-Sen Ting takes us into deep space to show how astronomers study the...
Grade Level   11 12
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56
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
We only know 4% of what the universe is made up of. Can we also know what lies beyond our galaxy ... and if there are undiscovered forms of matter? Luckily, we have space messengers — cosmic rays — that bring us physical data from parts of the cosmos beyond our reach. Veronica Bindi...
Grade Level   11 12
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57
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
A barometer is an instrument that measures air pressure, allowing weather forecasters and scientists to better predict extreme weather events. Despite its incredible usefulness, inventing the barometer was no walk in the park. Asaf Bar-Yosef describes the series of scientists and events that...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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58
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
There's a game of Tetris happening on a global scale: The playing space is planet Earth, and all those pesky, stacking blocks represent carbon dioxide -, a greenhouse gas that is piling up ever more rapidly as we burn the fossil fuels that run our cars, factories and power plants. Joss Fong outlines...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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59
By TED-Ed
Published in 2014
The atoms around you have existed for billions of years -, and most originated in the flaming, gaseous core of a star. Dennis Woldfogel tells the captivating tale of these atoms' long journey from the Big Bang to the molecules they form today.
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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60
By TED-Ed
Published in 2013
The shape, contents and future of the universe are all intricately related. We know that it's mostly flat; we know that it's made up of baryonic matter (like stars and planets), but mostly dark matter and dark energy; and we know that it's expanding constantly, so that all stars will eventually burn...
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