1
Thunder is the result of the rapid expansion of super heated air caused by the extremely high temperature of lightning. Through a series of examples, the student will be able to determine the distance to a lightning strike.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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2
SKYWARN is a concept developed in the early 1970d that was intended to promote a cooperatve effort between the National Weather Service and communities. The emphasis of the effort is often focused on the storm spotter, an individual who takes a position near their community and reports wind gusts,...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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3
The updrafts in thunderstorms can be extremely strong. The stronger the updraft, the more weight of rain and hair that can be supported. This experiment will show thta cotton balls, like clouds, hold a tremendous amount of water. In nature, once the weight of water is more than can be supported by...
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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4
Analyzing maps with the current weather conditions is an essential part of the entire forecast process. Basically, if we do not know what is currently occurring, it is near impossible to predict what will happen in the future. In this lesson plan, the students will determine the location of cold and...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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5
Meteorologists often refer to ridges and troughs in the upper atmosphere when explaining the reason for the weather one experiences. Yet all one sees are lines on a weather map. However, these weather systems are high and low places in the atmosphere as this lesson will demonstrate.
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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6
Clouds are divided into four basic forms (Cirro-form, Strato-form, Cumulo-form and Nimbo-form) at three basic levels (low, middle, and high) in the atmosphere. Many locations may experience all of these different types of clouds daily. The students will become better observers of the sky by...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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7
Collision and coalescence is the process by which cloud droplets grow large enough to fall as rain in clouds. You will suspend two ping pong balls in the stream of air supplied by a hair dryer. The balls will bump into each other, creating a clicking sound signifying the collision.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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8
We feel the wind everyday. The air is almost always in motion. One day it may be from the north and the next day from the south. There are many sources for wind: mechanical sources such as fans and, in nature, falling rain as it drags air along. But what is the origin of wind on the earth? Using a...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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9
Ocean water is salty and, in general, cold. Differences in the water density associated with temperature and salinity are vital in shaping the Great Ocean Conveyor. This lesson plan demonstrates how salinity and temperature affect density of water.
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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10
Onjects float if they weigh less than the weight o the water they displace. Conversely, onjects will sink if they weigh more than the weight of the water they displace. Students will observe how the added sigar in a can of soda affecs its ability to float in water by the change of density.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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11
Barometers using mercury are heavy and fragile. The first working version of an aneroid (without water) barometer was built in 1843 by French scientist Lucien Vidie. This made the barometer very portable and it became a commonly used meteorological instrument. It was still calibrated to the...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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12
The amount of air over us is constantly changing. As a result, the weight of that air, called pressure, is constantly changing. These changes in air pressure are indications of changes in our weather. We measure this change using a device called a barometer (bar-meter or measurer).
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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13
Pressure is not only a matter of altitude but also dependent upon the temperature. As the temperature increases so does the pressure. The molecules and atoms that comprise the air we breathe gain energy as they absorb heat. That increase in energy results in faster moving atoms which we observe as...
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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14
Bernoulli's principle states that in fluid flow, an increase in velocity occurs simultaneously with decrease in pressure. The students will discover that the faster air moves (air acting as a fluid), the lower the pressure beccomes within that air flow. They will see this effect blowing between two...
Grade Level   7 8 9 10 11 12
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15
To show that air has weight, the air is removed from one of two balanced balloons throwing the balance off.
Grade Level   5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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16
Set the air temperature and dew point in the four different altitudes and see what type of precipitation will fall to the ground. Watch closely, they may even change form as they fall!
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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17
The Science center for Teaching, Outreach, and Research on Meteorology (the STORM Project) at University of Northern Iowa (UNI) is a cooperative program between NOAA and UNI. The Project seeks to initiate, support, and coordinate education, service, and research activities that relate to weather...
Grade Level   9 10 11 12
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18
"Join Owlie and friends to embark on a """"Severe Weather Preparedness Adventure!""""Most appropriate for elementary and middle levels, this online game -- produced as part of NOAA and the National Weather Service's Young Meteorologist program -- teaches students how to stay safe through weather...
Grade Level   K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
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19
"The outward extent of wind moving around a hurricane is rarely uniform. The size of this wind firld is often skewed to the right side of the storm's forward progress. At the same time, the size of each tropical cyclone varies. One hurricane, while it may not be very powerful, could have a large...
Grade Level   10 11 12
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20
"Weather forecasting begins with measuring the current weather around us. One measurement that has been around a long time is the amount of rain a location has received. We will build rain gauges and when rain occurs, the students will be able to compare their total with each other and the...
Grade Level   4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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