1
Covering some 70 percent of Earth's surface, clouds play a key role in our planet's well-being. But how do they form, why are there so many types, and what clues can they give us about the weather and climate to come? Try your hand at classifying clouds and investigating the role they play in severe...
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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2
There are three states of matter: gas, liquid, and solid. Water in our atmosphere exists in these three states constantly. As the temperature of water vapor (a gas) decreases, it will reach the point at which it turns into a liquid (called the dew point or the point at which dew forms). This change...
Grade Level   3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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3
There are two methods water moves from the ground to the atmosphere as part of the hydrologic cycle. Transpiration is basically evaporation of water from plant leaves. Studies have revealed that transpiration accounts for about 10% of the moisture in the atmosphere, with oceans, seas, and other...
Grade Level   5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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4
Students can study the air currents within their classroom to examine how wind and ocean currents distribute particles through different environments.
Grade Level   2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
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5
Water in its liquid state is visible, as ponds, streams, water in bottles, and wet surfaces. You can also see water in its solid form , ice and snow. Water as a gas in the air, also called water vapor, is invisible. The process of visible liquid water turning into invisible gaseous water is called...
Grade Level   5 6
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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