1
In this activity you will measure changing weather conditions prior to, during, and after a storm.
Grade Level   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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2
In this activity, you will explore local rocks for signs of the Rock Cycle, the sequence of making and breaking down rocks.
Grade Level   5 6
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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3
Water in its liquid state is visible, as ponds, streams, water in bottles, and wet surfaces. You can also see water in its solid form , ice and snow. Water as a gas in the air, also called water vapor, is invisible. The process of visible liquid water turning into invisible gaseous water is called...
Grade Level   5 6
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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4
Earth's temperature is set, in part, by a balance between incoming radiation energy from the Sun and outgoing radiation energy into space. If more energy comes in than leaves, Earth's temperature will rise, and vice versa. The atmosphere plays a big role in this balance. In this activity, you will...
Grade Level   6 7 8
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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5
The greenhouse effect is the name scientists use to describe how heat accumulates in Earth's atmosphere. A majority of the energy from the Sun arrives at Earth as visible radiation. This energy passes through our atmosphere and warms Earth's surface. The warmed surface re-emits invisible infrared...
Grade Level   6 7 8
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6
Sunlight is constantly falling on Earth. At the same time, Earth is losing energy to the cold emptiness of outer space. In this activity, you will use a computer model to explore what happens to the Sun's energy when it strikes Earth.
Grade Level   6 7 8
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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7
Heat islands result when people alter their surroundings, substituting man-made asphalt roads, tar roofs, and other features for vegetation. Trees and other plants provide shade and cool the air through evapotranspiration. Hard, dark surfaces like pavement store heat during the day. That heat is...
Grade Level   6 7 8
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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8
"Some days it feels """"""""dry"""""""" and some days it feels """"""""muggy-"""""""" even though the temperature is the same. This is due to differing amounts of water vapor in the air. In this activity, you will measure relative humidity in the air using just a temperature sensor, by comparing the...
Grade Level   6 7 8
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9
There is always some water vapor in the air. For the most part we can't see it directly, but we can measure its presence with a relative humidity sensor. In this activity, you will use a relative humidity sensor and a soda bottle to measure humidity near surfaces, such as over a leaf or above an ice...
Grade Level   6 7 8
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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10
Much of the water cycle is visible, both in the form of liquid water (oceans, rivers, lakes, and precipitation such as rain) and in the form of solid water (ice, snow, and precipitation such as falling snow or hail). However, some of the water in the water cycle is invisible because water is also...
Grade Level   6 7 8
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11
We commonly experience the fact that in hot weather, lower humidity is more comfortable than higher humidity. Why? In this investigation, you will figure out how to condense water from your classroom air.
Grade Level   6 7 8
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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12
"You are familiar with how sweating cools your skin. You probably know that evaporating water causes the cooling effect. You probably have also observed that a moving air increases the cooling effect. In this activity, you will build an """"""""air conditioner"""""""" that just uses water and a...
Grade Level   6 7 8
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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13
Windmills have been used for hundreds of years to collect energy from the wind. They have been used to pump water, to grind grain, and -, more recently -, to generate electricity. In some modern wind generators, the blades are very thin. But there are many possible designs, and engineers are always...
Grade Level   3 4
Classroom Activities Curricula and Instruction
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